Roasted Pork Belly with Mung Bean Sprouts

This is more of a typical Singaporean meal than most of the meals I post.

  
Last Saturday I had the flu and my fridge was pretty empty, so I shuffled to the food court at the corner of Geylang Avenue and Lorong 29 to have this for lunch. I don’t really love the dark sweet sauce put on the pork. The pork belly was both chewy and crunchy as it should be. The broth was nice and peppery and the mung beans I ate because I felt deprived of vegetables. 

  
I felt better later the next day. 

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Oyster Omelette (蚵仔煎)

Just across the street from my apartment is a small food court. I’ll go there sometimes on the weekend.

I got this at Hup Kee Fried Oyster stall at the corner of Geylang Avenue and Lorong 29. 
This stall has one awards for their oyster omelette. It is very good. The omelette is cooked until it is browned on both sides, as my photo demonstrates. It’s then served with a sprig of cilantro.

  
I ordered the medium for $8 and it was a decent snack. 

BBQ Generation

This is a new restaurant that recently opened up on Lorong 25, near the Aljunied MRT station. 

I was drawn in by the brick walls, which are unusual for a Chinese restaurant. The menu posted in the window was only one page and not a book, like those of many Chinese restaurants. My favorite Chinese restaurant here, Old Chengdu, has a weighty tome for a menu, but I doubt that smaller places can execute every item from a long menu.

  
The price is reasonable and a lady, brought out each skewer as soon as they were ready. First to arrive were salty and chewy French beans.

  
Chicken skin skewers were delicious.

  
Spicy quail eggs

  
Tofu skin wrapped around string beans.

  
Beef and pork belly skewers

  
Chicken, Taiwanese sausage and grilled chilies came last.

   
 
It was all good and it came to $17.50. Not that cheap, but a light dinner. 

Kung Pao Chicken ( 宫保鸡丁)

Although this dish is on the menus of Chinese restaurants around the world, it really is an authentic Chinese dish.

From Wikipedia:

Kung Pao Chicken, (Chinese: 宫保鸡丁), also transcribed as Gong Bao or Kung Po, is a spicy stir-fry dish made with chicken, peanuts, vegetables, and chili peppers. The classic dish in Sichuan cuisine originated in the Sichuan Province of south-western China and includes Sichuan peppercorns. Although the dish is found throughout China, there are regional variations that are typically less spicy than the Sichuan serving. Kung Pao chicken is also a staple of westernized Chinese cuisine.


The Asian version isn’t as sweet as the kung pao chicken one might have at Panda Express or Champion House. There is the diced chicken, roasted chilies, cubed zucchini and bell peppers. There weren’t any Sichuan peppercorns present, sadly.

I had this last Sunday at the Northeast Chinese food restaurant around the corner from my apartment in Geylang.

I like Panda Express’ Kung pao chicken better. More salt, sugar and peanuts would have improved it.

Chicken Rice

When I first came to Singapore, I ate chicken rice all the time. Unfortunately, I got sick of it.

  
It’s not easy to make, not that I’ve ever tried. The chicken is moist and succulent. The bok choy is steamed and dressed with a light soy sauce. The rice itself is cooked in chicken broth.

It’s a wonderful dish. I ate this at the food court at the corner of Sims Avenue and Lorong 29 in Geylang.

  
The set cost $4.60. 

http://youtu.be/n1tl24AVSWg

Chicken Biryani

I had this for breakfast today. It was more than I could eat. I’d appreciate a better plating job. I mean, it is a fucking restaurant. Look at how messy that plate is! 

  
Many of the patrons apparently don’t give a fuck, but I do. I wouldn’t serve such a messy plate to someone in my home. 

  
Yeah, so I had this at Mufiz Indian Muslim Food Restaurant. 

The biryani was good as was the chicken. The workers there ought to give a fuck.