Boat Noodles 

I went to Bangkok Jam with some students last week for lunch. The lunch menu had ceased to exist. Everything else was kind of expensive for lunch, so I had this bowl of noodles, called boat noodles for some reason explained on the menu.

Rice noodles, pork meatballs, bean sprouts and lime juice- it would cost $2 in Thailand, but $10 here.   
I ordered it dry and the sweet and tangy broth was served on the side. 

Don’t expect fast service here at lunch. 

  

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Khao Soi Chicken Curry

On Sundays, sometimes all I want for dinner is soup and a sandwich. The Soup Spoon can make great soup and they can make insipid swill.

This time they made a really good chicken curry.

http://www.thesoupspoon.com/promotions/promotions-souperinspirations/

Fish cakes, chicken, lime juice, coconut milk and a bunch of other ingredients which you can find on their website are cooked together to make a creamy, spicy and tasty chicken curry. It was very good.

  
The falafel wrap was decent. 

  
There were tomato slices and some aioli involved. 

  
I had a hibiscus juice drink- ¡Jamaica!

Green Crayfish Laksa

It’s not very authentic, I know. I’m talking about Thai Express. But I had a craving for Thai food last Wednesday and I was too hungry to make it to Golden Mile. I couldn’t even think straight.

I thought laksa was a Peranakan dish, yet here was green laksa on the menu. I was surprised to read:

The origin of the name laksa is unclear. One theory[3] traces it back to the Hindi word lakhsha, which is in turn derived from Sanskritlaksh (Devanagari: लक्ष) meaning “one hundred thousand” (lakh),[4] referring to the vermicelli noodles used in the dish. It has also been suggested[5] that “laksa” may derive from the Chinese word (Cantonese: [làːt.sáː]), meaning “spicy sand” due to the ground dried prawns which gives a sandy or gritty texture to the sauce. The last theory[6] is that the name comes from the similar sounding word “dirty” in Hokkien due to its appearance.[citation needed]

Laksa is also known in Thailand as Lasae (Thai: ละแซ) or Laso (Thai: ละซอ)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laksa


An enormous crustacean of some sort, not the small crayfish I know and love, sat, split in two, in the middle of the bowl.

The sauce was spicy and savory. There might have been MSG present.


It took a lot of work to get the meat out of the shell. They should have done that in the kitchen.


The meat was good, but there was only about a big spoonful of it.


The prawn toast was mediocre and greasy.

 

I think I’m done with Thai Express.

Spaghetti with Pork Belly and Chilies

The menu claimed cracklings in the dish. While there were a few delicious chunks of seared pork belly, cracklings were conspicuously absent.

  
While it was good, there weren’t any cracklings.

   
   
On my night off from the gym I had a serious hankering for both soup and Thai food. 

Bangkok Jam, located in Bugis Junction is on my way home and more authentic and better than Thai Express.

  
The tom kha gai was a little sweet, but otherwise tasty. There were kaffir lime leaves in the spicy coconut broth and nice chunks of chicken. 

I was so hungry I even ordered dessert, mango sticky rice.

  
It was very good! 

Mango Salad with Fried Tuna

Thai Express is almost like Thai fast food. It’s not bad, anyway.

  
Green mango slices and chilies were dressed with a sauce of vinegar, fried minced tuna and sugar. Sweet, spicy and savory- I liked it. It was very spicy!

   
 
I drank a lemongrass iced tea that wasn’t too sweet.

  
My main course was chili seafood fried rice. It was good, but it wasn’t spicy at all. 

There were cashews, shrimp, raisins and squid on the plate. I’d never heard of raisins used in Thai cooking, but it worked. The rice was moist and I liked the fried egg on the side. 

Stuffed Betel Leaves

These leaves were harvested from the very same tree that provides humanity with carcinogenic betel nuts (槟榔). As far as I know, the leaves don’t cause oral cancer. I hope they don’t. One time I ought to be okay. 

  
At 1:00 are the leaves and something pulverized.

2:00 are crushed peanuts

4:00 shallots

6:00 chilies

8:00 dried shrimp

9:00 pomelo chunks 

11:00 chopped ginger 

Why was I here? Wednesday night I don’t go to the gym and I like to try something new on that night.

This restaurant is near Bugis Junction. 

   
 
That’s what it looks like. Google Maps tell me this place is called Sawadee Thai Cuisine. 

  
Put the ingredients on a leaf, plus the pungent sauce in the center and it looks something like this.

   
 
That’s tom kha gai, Thai coconut soup with chicken. In the coconut were chilies, galangal and lemongrass. It was delicious and I ate it all.

  
I had an iced lemongrass tea to drink. This tasted better than average.

What I really wanted to have for dessert was sticky rice with mango.

I settled for tapioca in coconut milk which wasn’t bad.

  

Papaya Salad

At a Thai restaurant on a cold day in Sydney, I had the best papaya salad I’ve ever tried. 

It was in the Haymarket area, but I can’t remember the name, nor did I care at the time. 

  
Crunchy, sour, spicy, fishy and savory, this was a full-strength salad, not pussified for feeble Western palates. In the salad were dried shrimp, chilies, cilantro, peanuts and lime juice and fish sauce in ample amounts.

  
My massaman curry was decent, but I would have preferred it to be oilier and spicier. 

  
The Thai iced tea was huge as were the dish portions.

  
The shrimp cakes were light and fresh. This was the second date and we got along very well.